Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Convento de San Francisco is the Spanish name for Saint Francis Monastery located in Lima, Peru at Ancash, south of Parque la Muralla and one block northeast from the Plaza Mayor. The church and convent are part of the Historic Centre of Lima, which was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1991. Aside from a church and monastery it also contains a library and catacombs. In this church, Jude the Apostle is venerated. At the feast of Saint Jude Tadeus a one and a half ton weighing silver stand is carried round in procession by 40 people, starting from the convent.
The convent’s library is world-renowned. It possesses about 25,000 antique texts, some of them predating the conquest. Some notable books are the first Spanish dictionary published by the Royal Spanish Academy and a Holy Bible edition from 1571- 1572 printed in Antwerp.

Convento de San Francisco is the Spanish name for Saint Francis Monastery located in Lima, Peru at Ancash, south of Parque la Muralla and one block northeast from the Plaza Mayor. The church and convent are part of the Historic Centre of Lima, which was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1991. Aside from a church and monastery it also contains a library and catacombs. In this church, Jude the Apostle is venerated. At the feast of Saint Jude Tadeus a one and a half ton weighing silver stand is carried round in procession by 40 people, starting from the convent.

The convent’s library is world-renowned. It possesses about 25,000 antique texts, some of them predating the conquest. Some notable books are the first Spanish dictionary published by the Royal Spanish Academy and a Holy Bible edition from 1571- 1572 printed in Antwerp.


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Picture Book Museum, also known as the Picture Book Library, is located in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando designed this privately-owned special library mainly to serve three local preschools. However, since the opening of its doors in 2005, visitors have flocked to the library on its open-access days to see Ando’s design and to enjoy the collection of international children’s books.
The building occupies 492.07 m² of space, with the total floorspace amounting to 634.05 m² in Ando’s building. Decorations are minimal, largely consisting of the books themselves in a cover-out display that dominates the space. The collection is international in scope and contains only picture books aimed at young children. There are 1300 books in the collection, which was privately compiled before being shared in the library.

The Picture Book Museum, also known as the Picture Book Library, is located in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando designed this privately-owned special library mainly to serve three local preschools. However, since the opening of its doors in 2005, visitors have flocked to the library on its open-access days to see Ando’s design and to enjoy the collection of international children’s books.

The building occupies 492.07 m² of space, with the total floorspace amounting to 634.05 m² in Ando’s building. Decorations are minimal, largely consisting of the books themselves in a cover-out display that dominates the space. The collection is international in scope and contains only picture books aimed at young children. There are 1300 books in the collection, which was privately compiled before being shared in the library.


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
St Paul’s Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren’s lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London.
The library’s collection was almost completely destroyed in the Great Fire of London. Lists surviving from 1313 onwards give a picture of the pre-fire library. Wren’s library chamber was restocked by the Commissioners for rebuilding St Paul’s: they bought collections, including valuable Bibles and liturgical texts, and were fortunate to receive a generous bequest in 1712 of nearly two thousand volumes from the library of Henry Compton, late Bishop of London. In 1783 the library of John Mangey, Vicar of Dunmow and Prebendary of St Paul’s, was added. In the nineteenth century large collections of ecclesiastical tracts and pamphlets were brought in and improvements made to the library’s holdings of sermons preached in the Cathedral and at Paul’s Cross. The subject strength of the historical collections lies in theology, church history and patristics. Current acquisitions are restricted to major works on the history of the Church in England, on Wren and the building of the Cathedral, the Church in the City, and ‘alumni’ material.

St Paul’s Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren’s lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London.

The library’s collection was almost completely destroyed in the Great Fire of London. Lists surviving from 1313 onwards give a picture of the pre-fire library. Wren’s library chamber was restocked by the Commissioners for rebuilding St Paul’s: they bought collections, including valuable Bibles and liturgical texts, and were fortunate to receive a generous bequest in 1712 of nearly two thousand volumes from the library of Henry Compton, late Bishop of London. In 1783 the library of John Mangey, Vicar of Dunmow and Prebendary of St Paul’s, was added. In the nineteenth century large collections of ecclesiastical tracts and pamphlets were brought in and improvements made to the library’s holdings of sermons preached in the Cathedral and at Paul’s Cross. The subject strength of the historical collections lies in theology, church history and patristics. Current acquisitions are restricted to major works on the history of the Church in England, on Wren and the building of the Cathedral, the Church in the City, and ‘alumni’ material.