Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris. The palace was built as a royal residence for Marie de Médicis, mother of king Louis XIII of France. Up until the French Revolution it was a princely residence.
Declared a National Palace in 1791, the Luxembourg Palace became home to the Directoire, the House of Peers (1814-1848), and the Senate of the Third Republic (from 1879).
Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade and adding a library.
In the room which has 2km of shelving are kept nearly 57,000 volumes.
The roof consists of a series of paintings representing the 12 signs of the Zodiac. They are the work of Jacob Jordaens, a better student of Flemish painter Rubens. In the center, the “Sunrise Dawn” is by Antoine Gallet.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris. The palace was built as a royal residence for Marie de Médicis, mother of king Louis XIII of France. Up until the French Revolution it was a princely residence.

Declared a National Palace in 1791, the Luxembourg Palace became home to the Directoire, the House of Peers (1814-1848), and the Senate of the Third Republic (from 1879).

Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade and adding a library.

In the room which has 2km of shelving are kept nearly 57,000 volumes.

The roof consists of a series of paintings representing the 12 signs of the Zodiac. They are the work of Jacob Jordaens, a better student of Flemish painter Rubens. In the center, the “Sunrise Dawn” is by Antoine Gallet.


Permalink - 11 November 2013 
The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 11 November 2013 
The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 11 November 2013 
The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 11 November 2013 
The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris. The palace was built as a royal residence for Marie de Médicis, mother of king Louis XIII of France. Up until the French Revolution it was a princely residence.
Declared a National Palace in 1791, the Luxembourg Palace became home to the Directoire, the House of Peers (1814-1848), and the Senate of the Third Republic (from 1879).
From 1799 to 1805 the architect Jean Chalgrin transformed the palace into a legislative building. He demolished the grand central staircase (escalier d’honneur), replacing it with a senate chamber on the first floor and enclosed the flanking terraces, making space for a library. The library functions as the Senate library and mainly comprises of law books. 

The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris. The palace was built as a royal residence for Marie de Médicis, mother of king Louis XIII of France. Up until the French Revolution it was a princely residence.

Declared a National Palace in 1791, the Luxembourg Palace became home to the Directoire, the House of Peers (1814-1848), and the Senate of the Third Republic (from 1879).

From 1799 to 1805 the architect Jean Chalgrin transformed the palace into a legislative building. He demolished the grand central staircase (escalier d’honneur), replacing it with a senate chamber on the first floor and enclosed the flanking terraces, making space for a library. The library functions as the Senate library and mainly comprises of law books. 


Permalink - 21 July 2013 
Karl Lagerfeld’s Private Library in Paris, France

Karl Lagerfeld’s Private Library in Paris, France


Permalink - 21 July 2013 
Karl Lagerfeld’s Private Library in Paris, France

Karl Lagerfeld’s Private Library in Paris, France


Permalink - 21 July 2013 
Karl Lagerfeld’s Private Library in Paris, France

Karl Lagerfeld’s Private Library in Paris, France


Permalink - 21 July 2013 
Karl Lagerfeld’s very large home library in his photo studio apartment in Central Paris. He had 60,000 books, mostly concerning fashion and art, making it one of the world’s largest private libraries. His bookshelves are made of thin steel, running the length of each wall of the large room, and three stories up. A steel circular staircase ascends to the steel catwalk that encircles the space about fifteen feet off the floor, and a steel platform ladder on wheels allows access to the higher books on the main level. A very industrial look, but the steel is a practical choice – needed to hold the extra weight of the glossy coffee-table art and fashion books, which are stored horizontally throughout.

Karl Lagerfeld’s very large home library in his photo studio apartment in Central Paris. He had 60,000 books, mostly concerning fashion and art, making it one of the world’s largest private libraries. His bookshelves are made of thin steel, running the length of each wall of the large room, and three stories up. A steel circular staircase ascends to the steel catwalk that encircles the space about fifteen feet off the floor, and a steel platform ladder on wheels allows access to the higher books on the main level. A very industrial look, but the steel is a practical choice – needed to hold the extra weight of the glossy coffee-table art and fashion books, which are stored horizontally throughout.


Permalink - 5 August 2012 
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Bibliothèque nationale de France


Permalink - 5 August 2012 
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Bibliothèque nationale de France