Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library Reading Room, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library Reading Room, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library Reading Room, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library Reading Room, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library Reading Room, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library Reading Room, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France

Sainte-Geneviève Library, Paris, France


Permalink - 8 October 2014 
Sainte-Geneviève Library (French: Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève) is a public and university library in Paris, which inherited the collection of the Abbey of St Genevieve. The library contains around 2 million documents. Between 1838 and 1850, a building for the Sainte-Geneviève Library was designed and constructed under the direction of the architect Henri Labrouste. The glass and iron reading room has been described as “magisterial” and the building itself as a seminal work in the creation of the modern library as “a temple of knowledge and space for contemplation”. The names of 810 illustrious scholars are inscribed on the building’s facade. Labrouste’s structure stands at the Sainte-Genevieve hill, across the street from the Panthéon in the Latin Quarter. When developing his design, Labrouste may have added the leafy garland band above the windows on the first level exterior nearly identical to the band on the Pantheon as a gesture of respect to its neighboring monument.

Sainte-Geneviève Library (French: Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève) is a public and university library in Paris, which inherited the collection of the Abbey of St Genevieve. The library contains around 2 million documents. Between 1838 and 1850, a building for the Sainte-Geneviève Library was designed and constructed under the direction of the architect Henri Labrouste. The glass and iron reading room has been described as “magisterial” and the building itself as a seminal work in the creation of the modern library as “a temple of knowledge and space for contemplation”. The names of 810 illustrious scholars are inscribed on the building’s facade. Labrouste’s structure stands at the Sainte-Genevieve hill, across the street from the Panthéon in the Latin Quarter. When developing his design, Labrouste may have added the leafy garland band above the windows on the first level exterior nearly identical to the band on the Pantheon as a gesture of respect to its neighboring monument.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 22 November 2013 
The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris. The palace was built as a royal residence for Marie de Médicis, mother of king Louis XIII of France. Up until the French Revolution it was a princely residence.
Declared a National Palace in 1791, the Luxembourg Palace became home to the Directoire, the House of Peers (1814-1848), and the Senate of the Third Republic (from 1879).
Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade and adding a library.
In the room which has 2km of shelving are kept nearly 57,000 volumes.
The roof consists of a series of paintings representing the 12 signs of the Zodiac. They are the work of Jacob Jordaens, a better student of Flemish painter Rubens. In the center, the “Sunrise Dawn” is by Antoine Gallet.

The French Senate Library Annexe in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris. The palace was built as a royal residence for Marie de Médicis, mother of king Louis XIII of France. Up until the French Revolution it was a princely residence.

Declared a National Palace in 1791, the Luxembourg Palace became home to the Directoire, the House of Peers (1814-1848), and the Senate of the Third Republic (from 1879).

Beginning in 1835 the architect Alphonse de Gisors added a new garden wing parallel to the old corps de logis, replicating the look of the original 17th-century facade and adding a library.

In the room which has 2km of shelving are kept nearly 57,000 volumes.

The roof consists of a series of paintings representing the 12 signs of the Zodiac. They are the work of Jacob Jordaens, a better student of Flemish painter Rubens. In the center, the “Sunrise Dawn” is by Antoine Gallet.


Permalink - 11 November 2013 
The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.


Permalink - 11 November 2013 
The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.

The French Senate Library in The Luxembourg Palace, Paris.