Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town is situated in the Old Drill Hall next to the city hall, and opposite the Grand Parade. It was the Carnegie grant that made it what it is today - a centre of excellence. The Central Library is 56-years-old and stocks books in all 11 languages. There are 102 libraries (which you may use with your Central Library card) in and around Cape Town; the Central Library is the largest. The library offers a large collection of books, DVDs, CDs, videos, newspaper and magazines about the city that date 22-years back (partly digitised), audio books and encyclopaedias.
More than 70, 000 people visit the Central Library every month. It is not only a place to rent books but also a place to meet people, to study and it’s a place to hang out too.

The Central Library of Cape Town is situated in the Old Drill Hall next to the city hall, and opposite the Grand Parade. It was the Carnegie grant that made it what it is today - a centre of excellence. The Central Library is 56-years-old and stocks books in all 11 languages. There are 102 libraries (which you may use with your Central Library card) in and around Cape Town; the Central Library is the largest. The library offers a large collection of books, DVDs, CDs, videos, newspaper and magazines about the city that date 22-years back (partly digitised), audio books and encyclopaedias.

More than 70, 000 people visit the Central Library every month. It is not only a place to rent books but also a place to meet people, to study and it’s a place to hang out too.


Permalink - 26 March 2014 
The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia

The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia


Permalink - 26 March 2014 
The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia

The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia


Permalink - 26 March 2014 
The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia

The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia


Permalink - 26 March 2014 
The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, designed by the architect Alexander Krasovsky in the late 19th century, once constituted a part of the private apartments of the last Russian Emperor Nicholas II. English Gothic motifs were widely used in the décor of this interior. The walnut coffers of the ceiling are adorned with four-petal rosettes. The main decorative elements of the library are bookcases arranged along the walls of the room and of the gallery reached by a staircase. This peculiar interior with its panels of stamped gilt leather, massive mantelpiece and high windows with openwork sashes evokes a romantic atmosphere of the Middle Ages. The library has survived to this day and is on permanent display at the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg.
Sadly, most of the original book collection is no longer present at the museum. In the early 1930s, 2,600 volumes from the book collections of the Romanov family were purchased by the United States Library of Congress through a New York book dealer. Variously called the Winter Palace Collection, the Tsar’s Library, and (more accurately) the Russian Imperial Collection, these elaborately bound volumes have been assigned, for the most part, to the Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division. The collection includes eighteenth- and nineteenth-century documents, biographies, works of literature, and military, social, and administrative histories, and reflects the reading interests of the imperial family and the types of publications they received as gifts. Books in English, French, and German are well represented, although the majority of the publications are in Russian. The volumes carry the bookplates of Alexander III, his wife Maria Fedorovna, Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra Fedorovna, their son Aleksei Nikolaevich, and other family members.

The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, designed by the architect Alexander Krasovsky in the late 19th century, once constituted a part of the private apartments of the last Russian Emperor Nicholas II. English Gothic motifs were widely used in the décor of this interior. The walnut coffers of the ceiling are adorned with four-petal rosettes. The main decorative elements of the library are bookcases arranged along the walls of the room and of the gallery reached by a staircase. This peculiar interior with its panels of stamped gilt leather, massive mantelpiece and high windows with openwork sashes evokes a romantic atmosphere of the Middle Ages. The library has survived to this day and is on permanent display at the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg.

Sadly, most of the original book collection is no longer present at the museum. In the early 1930s, 2,600 volumes from the book collections of the Romanov family were purchased by the United States Library of Congress through a New York book dealer. Variously called the Winter Palace Collection, the Tsar’s Library, and (more accurately) the Russian Imperial Collection, these elaborately bound volumes have been assigned, for the most part, to the Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division. The collection includes eighteenth- and nineteenth-century documents, biographies, works of literature, and military, social, and administrative histories, and reflects the reading interests of the imperial family and the types of publications they received as gifts. Books in English, French, and German are well represented, although the majority of the publications are in Russian. The volumes carry the bookplates of Alexander III, his wife Maria Fedorovna, Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra Fedorovna, their son Aleksei Nikolaevich, and other family members.


Permalink - 19 March 2014 
The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa

The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa


Permalink - 19 March 2014 
The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa

The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa


Permalink - 19 March 2014 
The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa

The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa


Permalink - 19 March 2014 
The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa

The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa


Permalink - 19 March 2014 
The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa

The Law Library in the Iowa State Capitol, Des Moines, Iowa


Permalink - 19 March 2014 
The Law Library inside the Iowa State Capitol, seat of the Iowa General Assembly, is located in Iowa’s capital city, Des Moines, and also houses the Iowa Senate, Iowa House of Representatives, the Office of the Governor, and the Offices of the Attorney General, Auditor, Treasurer, and Secretary of State. The architectural design of the Capitol, rectangular in form, with great windows and high ceilings, follows the traditional pattern of 19th century planning for public buildings. A modified and refined Renaissance style gives the impression of strength and dignity combined with utility.
The Library contains over one million volumes and volume equivalents and is one of the largest and finest collections of print, microform, and electronic legal materials in the United States. The collections of the Law Library cover all aspects of Anglo-American law. In addition the library has a very strong collection of foreign, international, and comparative law materials. The library also is fully computerized, both in its internal operations and in its public services, and provides hardwired and wireless access for library patrons to access an extensive range of computer research sources and library information.

The Law Library inside the Iowa State Capitol, seat of the Iowa General Assembly, is located in Iowa’s capital city, Des Moines, and also houses the Iowa Senate, Iowa House of Representatives, the Office of the Governor, and the Offices of the Attorney General, Auditor, Treasurer, and Secretary of State. The architectural design of the Capitol, rectangular in form, with great windows and high ceilings, follows the traditional pattern of 19th century planning for public buildings. A modified and refined Renaissance style gives the impression of strength and dignity combined with utility.

The Library contains over one million volumes and volume equivalents and is one of the largest and finest collections of print, microform, and electronic legal materials in the United States. The collections of the Law Library cover all aspects of Anglo-American law. In addition the library has a very strong collection of foreign, international, and comparative law materials. The library also is fully computerized, both in its internal operations and in its public services, and provides hardwired and wireless access for library patrons to access an extensive range of computer research sources and library information.