Permalink - 6 September 2014 
The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.


Permalink - 6 September 2014 
The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.


Permalink - 6 September 2014 
The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.


Permalink - 6 September 2014 
The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. 

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. 


Permalink - 6 September 2014 
The Biblioteca Palafoxiana is a library in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. Founded in 1646, it was the first public library in colonial Mexico, and is sometimes considered the first in the Americas. It has more than 41,000 books and manuscripts, ranging from the 15th to the 20th century. In 2005, it was listed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register.
The Biblioteca Palafoxiana owes its name and foundation to Juan de Palafox y Mendoza, bishop of Puebla. He was a lover of books, and is quoted as having said,

He who succeeds without books is in an inconsolable darkness, on a mountain without company, on a path without a crosier, in darkness without a guide.
The library was finished in 1773, consisting of a 43-meter-long vaulted hall on the Colegio’s second floor. Two levels of bookshelves were built, and a retablo of the Madonna of Trapani by Nino Pisano was acquired. By the mid-19th century, the size of the collection necessitated a third level of bookshelves.

Two earthquakes in 1999 caused damage to the building and shelves, leading to a restoration program in 2001

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana is a library in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico. Founded in 1646, it was the first public library in colonial Mexico, and is sometimes considered the first in the Americas. It has more than 41,000 books and manuscripts, ranging from the 15th to the 20th century. In 2005, it was listed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register.

The Biblioteca Palafoxiana owes its name and foundation to Juan de Palafox y Mendoza, bishop of Puebla. He was a lover of books, and is quoted as having said,

He who succeeds without books is in an inconsolable darkness, on a mountain without company, on a path without a crosier, in darkness without a guide.

The library was finished in 1773, consisting of a 43-meter-long vaulted hall on the Colegio’s second floor. Two levels of bookshelves were built, and a retablo of the Madonna of Trapani by Nino Pisano was acquired. By the mid-19th century, the size of the collection necessitated a third level of bookshelves.

Two earthquakes in 1999 caused damage to the building and shelves, leading to a restoration program in 2001


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru

Library of the Saint Francis Monastery in Lima, Peru


Permalink - 20 August 2014 
Convento de San Francisco is the Spanish name for Saint Francis Monastery located in Lima, Peru at Ancash, south of Parque la Muralla and one block northeast from the Plaza Mayor. The church and convent are part of the Historic Centre of Lima, which was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1991. Aside from a church and monastery it also contains a library and catacombs. In this church, Jude the Apostle is venerated. At the feast of Saint Jude Tadeus a one and a half ton weighing silver stand is carried round in procession by 40 people, starting from the convent.
The convent’s library is world-renowned. It possesses about 25,000 antique texts, some of them predating the conquest. Some notable books are the first Spanish dictionary published by the Royal Spanish Academy and a Holy Bible edition from 1571- 1572 printed in Antwerp.

Convento de San Francisco is the Spanish name for Saint Francis Monastery located in Lima, Peru at Ancash, south of Parque la Muralla and one block northeast from the Plaza Mayor. The church and convent are part of the Historic Centre of Lima, which was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1991. Aside from a church and monastery it also contains a library and catacombs. In this church, Jude the Apostle is venerated. At the feast of Saint Jude Tadeus a one and a half ton weighing silver stand is carried round in procession by 40 people, starting from the convent.

The convent’s library is world-renowned. It possesses about 25,000 antique texts, some of them predating the conquest. Some notable books are the first Spanish dictionary published by the Royal Spanish Academy and a Holy Bible edition from 1571- 1572 printed in Antwerp.


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan

The Museum of Picture Books in Fukushima, Japan


Permalink - 1 August 2014 
The Picture Book Museum, also known as the Picture Book Library, is located in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando designed this privately-owned special library mainly to serve three local preschools. However, since the opening of its doors in 2005, visitors have flocked to the library on its open-access days to see Ando’s design and to enjoy the collection of international children’s books.
The building occupies 492.07 m² of space, with the total floorspace amounting to 634.05 m² in Ando’s building. Decorations are minimal, largely consisting of the books themselves in a cover-out display that dominates the space. The collection is international in scope and contains only picture books aimed at young children. There are 1300 books in the collection, which was privately compiled before being shared in the library.

The Picture Book Museum, also known as the Picture Book Library, is located in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando designed this privately-owned special library mainly to serve three local preschools. However, since the opening of its doors in 2005, visitors have flocked to the library on its open-access days to see Ando’s design and to enjoy the collection of international children’s books.

The building occupies 492.07 m² of space, with the total floorspace amounting to 634.05 m² in Ando’s building. Decorations are minimal, largely consisting of the books themselves in a cover-out display that dominates the space. The collection is international in scope and contains only picture books aimed at young children. There are 1300 books in the collection, which was privately compiled before being shared in the library.