Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain

Library of St. Pauls Cathedral, London, Britain


Permalink - 22 July 2014 
St Paul’s Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren’s lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London.
The library’s collection was almost completely destroyed in the Great Fire of London. Lists surviving from 1313 onwards give a picture of the pre-fire library. Wren’s library chamber was restocked by the Commissioners for rebuilding St Paul’s: they bought collections, including valuable Bibles and liturgical texts, and were fortunate to receive a generous bequest in 1712 of nearly two thousand volumes from the library of Henry Compton, late Bishop of London. In 1783 the library of John Mangey, Vicar of Dunmow and Prebendary of St Paul’s, was added. In the nineteenth century large collections of ecclesiastical tracts and pamphlets were brought in and improvements made to the library’s holdings of sermons preached in the Cathedral and at Paul’s Cross. The subject strength of the historical collections lies in theology, church history and patristics. Current acquisitions are restricted to major works on the history of the Church in England, on Wren and the building of the Cathedral, the Church in the City, and ‘alumni’ material.

St Paul’s Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren’s lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London.

The library’s collection was almost completely destroyed in the Great Fire of London. Lists surviving from 1313 onwards give a picture of the pre-fire library. Wren’s library chamber was restocked by the Commissioners for rebuilding St Paul’s: they bought collections, including valuable Bibles and liturgical texts, and were fortunate to receive a generous bequest in 1712 of nearly two thousand volumes from the library of Henry Compton, late Bishop of London. In 1783 the library of John Mangey, Vicar of Dunmow and Prebendary of St Paul’s, was added. In the nineteenth century large collections of ecclesiastical tracts and pamphlets were brought in and improvements made to the library’s holdings of sermons preached in the Cathedral and at Paul’s Cross. The subject strength of the historical collections lies in theology, church history and patristics. Current acquisitions are restricted to major works on the history of the Church in England, on Wren and the building of the Cathedral, the Church in the City, and ‘alumni’ material.


Permalink - 1 July 2014 
National Library Of The Girolamini Oratory, Naples

National Library Of The Girolamini Oratory, Naples


Permalink - 1 July 2014 
National Library Of The Girolamini Oratory, Naples

National Library Of The Girolamini Oratory, Naples


Permalink - 1 July 2014 
National Library Of The Girolamini Oratory, Naples

National Library Of The Girolamini Oratory, Naples


Permalink - 1 July 2014 
The Biblioteca Girolamini is the library associated with The Church and Convent of the Girolamini since the 16th century. It has contained many thousands of manuscripts and printed volumes. The church and complex take their name of Girolamini from that which was first applied to the priests of the Oratory and which is derived from the Church of San Girolamo della Carità in Rome, where St Philip Neri first established his religious exercises. The much larger second cloister, dating from the 17th century, is reached from the first; in it are found the entrances to both the “Quadreria” or art collection, previously housed in the sacristy of the Church, and the magnificent library of the Oratorian Fathers, the Biblioteca Girolamini, now run by the Italian state.

In December 2013, news reporting was published that there had been systematic looting of the Biblioteca Girolamini. The old library had been methodically stripped of valuable volumes, thousands of antique texts disappeared and were sold on the private market. Library Director Marino Massimo de Caro was arrested soon after investigations began in 2012 and convicted along with accomplices in early 2013 and sentenced to seven years gaol. Although, due to his cooperation this was commuted to house arrest. Around 80% of the lost volumes had been recovered by late 2013, with the assistance of antiquarian booksellers and collectors, although many valuable artefacts remain unaccounted for.

The Biblioteca Girolamini is the library associated with The Church and Convent of the Girolamini since the 16th century. It has contained many thousands of manuscripts and printed volumes. The church and complex take their name of Girolamini from that which was first applied to the priests of the Oratory and which is derived from the Church of San Girolamo della Carità in Rome, where St Philip Neri first established his religious exercises. The much larger second cloister, dating from the 17th century, is reached from the first; in it are found the entrances to both the “Quadreria” or art collection, previously housed in the sacristy of the Church, and the magnificent library of the Oratorian Fathers, the Biblioteca Girolamini, now run by the Italian state.

In December 2013, news reporting was published that there had been systematic looting of the Biblioteca Girolamini. The old library had been methodically stripped of valuable volumes, thousands of antique texts disappeared and were sold on the private market. Library Director Marino Massimo de Caro was arrested soon after investigations began in 2012 and convicted along with accomplices in early 2013 and sentenced to seven years gaol. Although, due to his cooperation this was commuted to house arrest. Around 80% of the lost volumes had been recovered by late 2013, with the assistance of antiquarian booksellers and collectors, although many valuable artefacts remain unaccounted for.


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa

The Central Library of Cape Town, South Africa


Permalink - 23 April 2014 
The Central Library of Cape Town is situated in the Old Drill Hall next to the city hall, and opposite the Grand Parade. It was the Carnegie grant that made it what it is today - a centre of excellence. The Central Library is 56-years-old and stocks books in all 11 languages. There are 102 libraries (which you may use with your Central Library card) in and around Cape Town; the Central Library is the largest. The library offers a large collection of books, DVDs, CDs, videos, newspaper and magazines about the city that date 22-years back (partly digitised), audio books and encyclopaedias.
More than 70, 000 people visit the Central Library every month. It is not only a place to rent books but also a place to meet people, to study and it’s a place to hang out too.

The Central Library of Cape Town is situated in the Old Drill Hall next to the city hall, and opposite the Grand Parade. It was the Carnegie grant that made it what it is today - a centre of excellence. The Central Library is 56-years-old and stocks books in all 11 languages. There are 102 libraries (which you may use with your Central Library card) in and around Cape Town; the Central Library is the largest. The library offers a large collection of books, DVDs, CDs, videos, newspaper and magazines about the city that date 22-years back (partly digitised), audio books and encyclopaedias.

More than 70, 000 people visit the Central Library every month. It is not only a place to rent books but also a place to meet people, to study and it’s a place to hang out too.


Permalink - 26 March 2014 
The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia

The Library of Emperor Nicholas II in the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia