Permalink - 1 October 2014 
Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark


Permalink - 1 October 2014 
Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark


Permalink - 1 October 2014 
Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark


Permalink - 1 October 2014 
Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen University Library (Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark


Permalink - 1 October 2014 
Copenhagen University Library (Danish: Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark, is the main research library of the University of Copenhagen. Founded in 1582, it is the oldest library in Denmark.
The old main building of the library is located in Fiolstræde in central Copenhagen. It was designed by Johan Daniel Herholdt and completed in 1861. Herholdt’s University Library is built to a Neo-Gothic design. Its strong use of red brick heralded a new, destinctive trend in Danish architecture[ which was to characterize many of the large cultural and civic buildings of the preceding decades.
The building was the first in Denmark to have a structural system of cast iron. This was a requirement to prevent future fires and Herholdt was inspired by the Crystal Palace at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London which he had visited during a stay in England . Another source of inspiration was the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris which had been built 1843 to 1859 with a similar underlying structure.

Copenhagen University Library (Danish: Københavns Universitetsbibliotek) in Copenhagen, Denmark, is the main research library of the University of Copenhagen. Founded in 1582, it is the oldest library in Denmark.

The old main building of the library is located in Fiolstræde in central Copenhagen. It was designed by Johan Daniel Herholdt and completed in 1861. Herholdt’s University Library is built to a Neo-Gothic design. Its strong use of red brick heralded a new, destinctive trend in Danish architecture[ which was to characterize many of the large cultural and civic buildings of the preceding decades.

The building was the first in Denmark to have a structural system of cast iron. This was a requirement to prevent future fires and Herholdt was inspired by the Crystal Palace at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London which he had visited during a stay in England . Another source of inspiration was the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris which had been built 1843 to 1859 with a similar underlying structure.


Permalink - 26 September 2014 
Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany

Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany


Permalink - 26 September 2014 
Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany

Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany


Permalink - 26 September 2014 
Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany

Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany


Permalink - 26 September 2014 
Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany

Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany


Permalink - 26 September 2014 
Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany

Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany


Permalink - 26 September 2014 
The Herzog August library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany, known also as Bibliotheca Augusta, was founded by Julius, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, in 1572. In the 17th century it was the largest library north of the Alps. The library was named for Duke Augustus (1579-1666). He built the collection, which was kept at Wolfenbüttel. Armies passed by, back and forth, over the centuries, but the collection was well protected. It was so highly regarded that generals placed the library under special protection, and the library is one of the oldest in the world to have never suffered loss to its collection.
In 2006 the library housed around 900,000 books, 350,000 of them were printed from the 15th to the 18th century. Of these, 3,500 are incunabula, 75,000 are from the sixteenth century, 150,000 are from the seventeenth century, and 120,000 are from the eighteenth century.

The Herzog August library in Wolfenbüttel, Germany, known also as Bibliotheca Augusta, was founded by Julius, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, in 1572. In the 17th century it was the largest library north of the Alps. The library was named for Duke Augustus (1579-1666). He built the collection, which was kept at Wolfenbüttel. Armies passed by, back and forth, over the centuries, but the collection was well protected. It was so highly regarded that generals placed the library under special protection, and the library is one of the oldest in the world to have never suffered loss to its collection.

In 2006 the library housed around 900,000 books, 350,000 of them were printed from the 15th to the 18th century. Of these, 3,500 are incunabula, 75,000 are from the sixteenth century, 150,000 are from the seventeenth century, and 120,000 are from the eighteenth century.


Permalink - 17 September 2014 
The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain

The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain


Permalink - 17 September 2014 
The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain

The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain


Permalink - 17 September 2014 
The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain

The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain


Permalink - 17 September 2014 
The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain

The University of Salamanca Library, Salamanca, Spain